Read Where You Are!

academy-2816Child Care Aware® of America (CCAoA) is happy to join in the effort to prevent the “summer slide” by signing on to the Read Where You Are campaign put together by the Department of Education!

Wednesday, July 29 is the Read Where You Are day of action – join us in taking time out to read to a child, and then share your photos on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter using the hashtag #ReadWhereYouAre.

The Read Where You Are campaign is a reminder that reading can happen anywhere – on a train, on a bus, in a park or library, or even at home or in a child care setting. Why not use the last few weeks of childrens-books-570121_1280summer vacation to help all young people – even the littlest ones – keep their minds sharp and get ready to go back to school in the fall.

Ready to get started? You can find a great list of books for summer reading here:

So dig in, and start reading where YOU are!

Celebrate the National Day of Summer Learning

The nationwide Day of Summer Learning is Friday, June 19, 2015! This is a national advocacy day led by the National Summer Learning Association (NSLA) and meant to show the importance of continuing learning, safety and wellness for children during the summer months.

While participation in summer learning programs has increased, there is still a tremendous unmet demand for more programs according to a new America After 3PM study, which shows that 33 percent of families say that at least one of their children participated in a summer program in 2013 while 51% of parents say they want their children in a summer program.

Some of the demographics of children in summer learning programs, according to the America After 3PM study:

  • 42% are African-American
  • 39% are Hispanic
  • 34% are in a federal free or reduced-price lunch program

According to NSLA:

Research shows that summers without quality learning opportunities put our nation’s youth at risk for falling behind – year after year – in core subjects like math and reading. The math and reading skills low-income students lose each summer are cumulative and contribute significantly to the achievement gap between lower- and higher-income kids.

Our children need support and resources to help close the achievement gap and give them a chance to move ahead, not play catch up! As a supporter of early education initiatives and childhood learning, Child Care Aware® of America would like to join NSLA in asking everyone to take the pledge to #KeepKidsLearning this the summer. You can find events around the country taking place on Friday, June 19!


Office of Science and Technology Policy Spotlights the Importance of Early Literacy

Editor’s Note: This guest blog was written by Child Care Aware of America staff member Michelle McCready. Michelle is our Director of Public Policy, a working mother to her young son, Aiden, and a dedicated advocate for child care policy.

Yesterday Child Care Aware of America joined the White House Office of Science & Technology Policy to highlight early literacy challenges and successes in communities across the country and share best practices and lessons learned. The word gap refers to children in low income communities starting school with 30 million less words  than their peers of higher socioeconomic status. The day consisted of advocates, led by Too Small to Fail, alongside top researchers and scientists, as well as federal and local policymakers, discussing the importance of creating a strong literacy foundation for all children.


This strong literacy foundation helps prepare students for kindergarten and  sets children up for better outcomes throughout their life. This foundation also supports a workforce needed to compete in the global economy and create a prosperous future for generations to come. In the first three years of life early language and rich literacy experiences are especially important. As research has proven, the brain undergoes its most dramatic development during this time as children acquire the ability to think, speak, learn, and reason. As a mother of a 19 month-old son, I get to witness this dramatic development every day. On our ride home from child care, I talk, read, and sing with him and see how his vocabulary is exponentially blossoming.

But it’s not just my son. On a typical day more than 11 million children under age 5 spend an average of 35 hours a week in the care of someone other than their mother. About one-quarter of these children are in multiple child care arrangements. In these settings, children are naturally communicating with their caregivers on what they think, feel and are experiencing. This “conversational duet” not only promotes language skills, but also critical thinking skills, and strong social and emotional development.

Speaking and honoring home language is also critical.  Children  need to have lots of fun and meaningful chances to talk, read, and pretend-write in their home language. Each of the opportunities to interact build skills that will help all children be prepared for a successful life.

Make sure to visit to get more information on how you and your child’s caregiver can best build your child’s early reading and writing skills. A call to your local Child Care Resource & Referral agency (CCR&R) can give you additional information about literacy resources.

Also, make sure to check out what some of our coalition partners are doing: Too Small to Fail’s Talk, Read, Sing Campaign And ZERO TO THREE’s new web portal, Beyond the Word Gap, which offers multimedia resources to help parents, professionals, and policymakers to support early language and literacy.

Early literacy programs give young children a bright start

Learn more about what Nemours BrightStart! is doing to get children ready to read in this guest blog post from Caroline Schierle. Caroline and her colleague Kerry Eldred will present at the 2014 Symposium

If a child is not reading on grade level by the end of first grade, there is only a 10 percent chance he will read on grade level in fourth grade. This is a frightening statistic considering most children with reading difficulties are not identified until the second or third grade.

But there is good news. The vision of Nemours BrightStart! (NBS!) is that every child becomes a reader. Through innovative programs, research, advocacy, leadership and partnerships, NBS! works to promote reading success and prevent reading failure in children.

NBS! is rooted in the belief that early identification of reading difficulties is paramount. Children are most likely to become successful readers when they begin kindergarten with strong reading readiness skills. Pre-kindergarten is an ideal time to identify at-risk children and provide early intervention when children’s brains are adaptable and responsive. Further, providing exposure to important early literacy skills at a young age is easier and more economical than paying for remedial services if a child has fallen behind later in school.

Research has shown that the NBS! program significantly improves early literacy skills of pre-kindergarteners at risk for reading failure, with two-thirds of children who receive the small-group, multi-sensory instruction moving to the typical range in their reading readiness skills. Due to its success, the program has expanded to reach more children at-risk for reading failure and is now in child care centers and schools across 18 states, including Florida, California, Louisiana, Texas, and Virginia.

In addition to providing classroom instruction and training teachers across the country to implement the program in their own classrooms, NBS! provides free early literacy screenings for children in the community where early learning experts explain to parents what their children’s scores mean about their level of early literacy skills.

NBS! recognizes the importance of parents as a child’s first teacher. NBS! is currently developing and piloting informational workshops for parents to share knowledge of child development, shared book reading techniques, and ideas for everyday learning activities. NBS! is also wrapping up a two-year research study examining the effectiveness of training parents how to do early literacy activities with their children at home.

For more information, visit the NBS! website at

Caroline Schierle is a Research and Evaluation Specialist at Nemours BrightStart! where she manages data from ongoing projects within Jacksonville, FL. Prior to working as a researcher, she worked one-on-one with young adults with learning disabilities. As a result of this rewarding work combined with her educational background with degrees in Sociology and Psychology, she has a unique perspective and drive to understand and improve early childhood education through both research and applied best practices.

Nemours BrightStart! researches, develops and offers evidence-based tools targeting young children at risk for reading failure. The goal of NBS! is to effectively instruct children at the very beginning of their reading journey to ensure long-term reading success. Nemours BrightStart! helps parents, educators, health care professionals and community leaders understand key concepts and actions needed to promote reading success for all children through a variety of specific tools, services and resources.